Storm Brendan leave Aer Lingus passengers ‘fainting, crying and needing oxygen’

Passengers were crying and one fainted after Storm Brendan's brutal gales battered an Aer Lingus plane forced to land in turbulent conditions.

The jet was heading back to Cork from Dutch capital Amsterdam on Monday morning in the height of the orange weather warning.

The first attempt at landing was aborted and the pilot had to circle above the airport for more than an hour before his second opportunity.

One passenger told CorkBeo those around her became nervous, but praised the pilot and Aer Lingus staff for keeping those on board safe.

"I was sitting with my friends in the last row. Three of my friends are nervous flyers and were crying after we failed to land," Elizabeth Meehan, 20, said today.


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"To be fair, I think the plane in general was calm enough for maybe 20 minutes but then people did start get to nervous especially after a person fainted and required oxygen.

"Have to say the Aer Lingus staff were very kind to my friends and were extremely calm and all credit to the pilot for landing us safely.

"I'm very use to flying but it was definitely the worst flight I have ever been on and it was the first time in my life that I clapped when we landed."


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After the first attempt, the plane had to wait for a London flight to land and then for a lull in the winds so they could get to the ground.

Passengers on board were told if they were unable to land in the second attempt they would be diverted to Dublin but thankfully got to the ground safely at around 11.30am.

Storm Brendan continues to wreak havoc across the UK now.

An enormous chunk of a roof was torn off of a block of flats in Slough, Berkshire, last night.

Weather warnings are still in force for more rain across the southeast of England today.

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