NHS podiatrist struck off after charging patient £15 to cut toenails

NHS podiatrist is struck off after charging patient £15 to cut their toenails

  • Podiatrist Ceri Eccles was struck off for dishonesty after charging a patient 
  • She worked for University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust
  • When challenged, she falsely claimed her patient had been ‘very confused’
  • A remote disciplinary panel found ‘no assurance’ she would not repeat conduct 

An NHS podiatrist has been struck off after charging a patient for her services and then claiming the woman had been ‘very confused’ when she was challenged about the indiscretion.

Ceri Eccles asked for £15 to cut her patient’s toenails during a home visit and subsequently lied about the incident, a tribunal was told.

She has now been struck off by a disciplinary panel for dishonesty.

NHS chiropodist Ceri Eccles has been struck off for dishonesty after she was discovered charging a patient for her services (file pic)

A hearing at the Health and Care Professions Tribunal Service was told Ms Eccles had worked full time at the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust for 18 years.

She had in the past treated private clients outside the NHS occasionally.

In a witness statement, a physiotherapist said that that she visited the patient – identified only as Patient A – on March 20, 2018 and noticed her toenails needed cutting.

The NHS worker said that she happened to see Ms Eccles at another patient’s house a week later.

She said that Ms Eccles mentioned just visiting Patient A and when she later visited the patient herself, she noticed her toenails had been cut.

The panel heard that while carrying out her work she commented that Patient A’s nails had been done and her partner said that they were really pleased with them, they complimented Eccles and said she had been ‘lovely’.

A hearing at the Health and Care Professions Tribunal Service was told Ms Eccles had worked full time at the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust for 18 years 

In her witness statement, the physiotherapist said she then asked if Eccles was the person who had performed the treatment, and her partner confirmed it was.

She said that the partner added that they were surprised the service cost ‘only £15’.

However, the panel then heard a witness statement from Ms Eccles’ line manager about a conversation the pair had had, in which Eccles lied about ever having treated Patient A.

When she was shown proof that she had, Ms Eccles admitted she did remember her, but said she had been ‘very confused’.

The panel – held remotely – concluded that she should be struck off for dishonesty.

‘The Registrant (Eccles) had been dishonest in the course of her employment,’ it said. ‘(We have) received no assurance that she would not repeat her dishonest conduct.’

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