Joe Rogan rants about media coverage after taking ivermectin for COVID: ‘Bro, do I have to sue CNN?’

Joe Rogan, who recently revealed his COVID diagnosis as well as a controversial treatment regimen that included ivermectin, took to the most recent episode of his podcast to talk about his illness as well as question media coverage of his recovery.

On the Sept. 7 episode of “The Joe Rogan Experience,” the host was teased by his guest, Tom Segura, who referred to him as “Horse Worm Rogan,” a reference to the fact that versions of ivermectin are used to deworm livestock.

“Bro, do I have to sue CNN?” he said. “They’re making shit up! They keep saying I’m taking horse dewormer. I literally got it from a doctor. It’s an American company. They won the Nobel Prize in 2015 for use in human beings and CNN is saying I’m taking horse dewormer. They must know that’s a lie.”

“CNN was saying I’m a distributor of misinformation,” he also said.

Rogan’s treatment, according to a video he posted on Sept. 1, included, “Monoclonal antibodies, ivermectin, Z-Pak, prednisone, everything. I also got an NAD drip and a vitamin drip and I did that three days in a row.”

This raised pointed coverage from CNN, including a “Don Lemon Tonight” segment with Dr. Jonathan Reiner, who said, “He’s promoting kind of a crazy jumble of you know, sort of folk remedies and internet-prescribed drugs. It’s, again, dangerous now. He should have more sense after encountering the disease. And again, I hope he does well and gets well quickly. He’s not helping matters when he promotes this sort of nonsense therapeutic mix.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration currently runs has a page on their website titled “Why You Should Not Use Ivermectin to Treat or Prevent COVID-19.” According to the language on their site, “There seems to be a growing interest in a drug called ivermectin for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19 in humans. Certain animal formulations of ivermectin such as pour-on, injectable, paste, and ‘drench,’ are approved in the U.S. to treat or prevent parasites in animals. For humans, ivermectin tablets are approved at very specific doses to treat some parasitic worms, and there are topical (on the skin) formulations for head lice and skin conditions like rosacea.”

Watch the full segment below:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=3O_7O9_nV10%3Fversion%3D3%26rel%3D1%26showsearch%3D0%26showinfo%3D1%26iv_load_policy%3D1%26fs%3D1%26hl%3Den-US%26autohide%3D2%26wmode%3Dtransparent

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