Ilhan Omar blasted for misspelling book of the Bible while attempting to slam Marco Rubio on faith

ILHAN Omar has been blasted for misspelling book of the Bible while attempting to slam Marco Rubio on faith.

The typo arose on Wednesday after Senator Rubio criticized Georgia Senate candidate Raphael Warnock for claiming that someone could not serve both God and the military.

Rubio retweeted a video of Warnock, with the caption: "Not shocked #Georgia Democrat Senate candidate Raphael Warnock said "You cannot serve God and the military" at the same time. These & even crazier things is what the radicals who control the Democratic party’s activist & small dollar donor base believe."

Omar then responded to his comments with a verse from the Bible.

"Mathews [sic] 6:24" she tweeted, prefaced with an embarrassed face emoji.

The book is in fact called the Gospel of Matthew, one of the four gospels recognized in Christian canon.

Omar then posted one of the verses: "No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money."

She then appears to try to relate the verse to Rubio's comments, writing: "The lies and smears of the GOP have no boundaries, but this is a disgrace and shameful."

Both her interpretations and spelling were slammed by social media users.

Daily Wire reporter Ryan Saavedra tweeted: "Bible expert Ilhan Omar quotes the book of "Mathews." Also, she has no idea what she is talking about and she's wrong."

Others mocked "The Book of Chris Matthews," and "I love Ross Mathews! I didn't know he had a book though…"

Omar was referring to Matthew 6:24, which, in the Revised Standard Version, reads: "No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon."

Mammon refers to an idol representing materialism or concern for wealth.

However, during his 2011 sermon, Warnock appeared to associate Mammon with the military.

"America, nobody can serve God and the military," Warnock said at the time.

"You can't serve God and money. You cannot serve God and mammon at the same time. America, choose ye this day who you will serve. Choose ye this day."

However, the Warnock campaign argued that the remoarks were taken out of context when asked by Fox News.

"This sermon is based on a biblical verse that reads ‘No man can serve two masters… Ye cannot serve God and mammon,’ a biblical term for wealth," Terrence Clark, communications director for the Warnock campaign, said.

"Reverend Warnock was speaking about the need to commit to moral life before pursuing other priorities."

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