Boris Becker will remain bankrupt until 2031

Boris Becker’s bankruptcy is extended by 12 YEARS after authorities found he hid £4.5m in assets and transactions

  • Boris Becker, 51, was supposed to have served just one year as a bankrupt
  • But Wimbledon tennis champion will now face restrictions until October 2031
  • Term is extended after it was discovered that he had not disclosed all his assets

Boris Becker at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium in North London on October 1

Boris Becker’s bankruptcy has been extended by 12 years after authorities found he had hidden assets and transactions of £4.5million.

Becker, 51, was supposed to have served just one year as a bankrupt, but he will now face restrictions until October 2031.

The three times Wimbledon champion and tennis commentator was told last month that the term was to be extended after it was discovered that he had not disclosed all his assets to the Official Receiver.

A statement from the Insolvency service said: ‘The Official Receiver investigated undisclosed transactions occurring before and after the bankruptcy proceedings, totalling over £4.5million.

‘Bankruptcy restrictions are usually lifted after a year but, owing to the nature of Boris Becker’s actions, the Official Receiver pursued extended restrictions to prevent Mr Becker causing further harm to his creditors.

Becker is pictured with his now ex-wife Lilly during Oktoberfest 2017 in Munich, Germany

Becker split from Lilly (together in Berlin in November 2010) after nine years of marriage

‘Mr Becker offered a Bankruptcy Restrictions Undertaking, which was accepted on October 17, 2019 and lasts until October 16, 2031.’

Anthony Hannon, Public Interest Official Receiver for the Insolvency Service, said: ‘Bankrupts have a duty to fully cooperate with their trustee and where this has been frustrated, a bankruptcy restriction undertaking of commensurate length must reflect that conduct.’

Becker was made bankrupt in June 2017 after a failure to pay £3.3million to private banking firm Arbuthnot Latham.

At the time he claimed he had not been given sufficient time to sell some assets to repay the bank and branded the case a ‘gravy train for the suits’. 

He added: ‘I will be coming after the people who forced this process through.’ 

Becker with his son Noah and now ex-wife Lilly in Richmond, South West London, in June 2007

Earlier this year Becker put 82 items from his illustrious tennis career up for auction including a certificate commemorating his 1992 Olympics double win with Michael Stich and a watch given to him by Novak Djokovic.

The online auction of his trophies and memorabilia in July raised more than £680,000, with his 1989 US Open trophy attracting the highest bid of £150,250.

The auction had been due in 2018 but was delayed after Becker claimed diplomatic immunity from bankruptcy proceedings by taking up a role with Central African Republic as a sports envoy. 

The restrictions mean Becker cannot borrow more than £50 without telling the lender that he is bankrupt, he can’t be a company director and he can’t play a part in running a company without the permission of a court.

Boris Becker is pictured while playing in a semi-final at Wimbledon in London in July 1985

Becker, who won six Grand Slam singles titles in his career, was made bankrupt on June 21, 2017 in London’s High Court. 

Becker’s abandoned Mallorcan mansion is on the market for £9million – but a German squatter who lives there said last week that no one will pay for it.

The once-majestic home features stables, an outdoor swimming pool, four guest houses, a helicopter pad and a tennis court made from parts of Wimbledon furniture.

Property brochures still list the mansion for sale with idyllic photos of it, but the villa and grounds have become dilapidated and the tennis court is in a state of disrepair.

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