ISIS propaganda app that praised deadly Kabul bombing against U.S. troops relies on Amazon Web Services

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One of the Islamic State's propaganda arms, which celebrated a Kabul airport bombing that killed 13 American soldiers, uses a website and app hosted by Amazon Web Services. 

Nida-e-Haqq, an ISIS media group that disseminates terrorist propaganda in the Urdu language, promoted the bombing by posting a photo of the alleged suicide bomber donning a suicide vest before the Thursday attack, according to a Washington Post report

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Rita Katz, executive director at SITE Intelligence Group, told the Post that the source code for the app draws words and images from the pro-ISIS group and has been hosted by Amazon Web Services since April despite the platform’s pledge to not work with terrorist groups.

"It’s just mind-blowing that even after all these years, ISIS could still find a way to exploit a hosting company like Amazon," Katz said. "Of course, we should presume that ISIS will always be searching for ways to bypass security protocols, but this app isn’t even trying to stay low-key. It is blatantly filled with official ISIS claims, media, and logos of ISIS’ media arms, clear as day. This app was clearly created to keep ISIS’ message and content alive and distributed online. … It is clear that the stakes of keeping such content offline [are] no less major than in past years."

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According to AWS policy, the platform does not allow customers to use the service for any acts that "threaten, incite, promote, or actively encourage violence, terrorism, or other serious harm."

Earlier this year, Amazon suspended service to the social media app Parler, partially owned by conservative radio host Dan Bongino, because the platform posted videos and messages associated with the January 6 Capitol riot.

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Parler sued Amazon and was ultimately denied by a U.S. district judge who said that Amazon was not required to host "incendiary speech."

"The Court rejects any suggestion that the public interest favors requiring [Amazon Web Services] to host the incendiary speech that the record shows some of Parler's users have engaged in," U.S. District Judge Barbara Rothstein said in a ruling against Parler. "At this stage, on the showing made thus far, neither the public interest nor the balance of equities favors granting an injunction in this case."

Both Amazon and Amazon Web Services did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Fox News.

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