Where People From Ohio Are Moving the Most

Citing 2019 Census Bureau statistics, Cleveland.com estimates that one in three native Ohioans no longer reside in the Buckeye State. That means that 3.7 million former inhabitants now live outside Ohio, compared to the 8.7 million who still do. (See how every state’s population has changed since 2010.)

In fact, the state ranked No. 9 on a list of the top 10 states for move-outs, according to a 2020 National Movers Study by United Van Lines.

Where are the people who move out of Ohio going? To find out, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed state-to-state migration flows from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey, revealing the number of people living in other states (or Washington D.C.) in 2019 who had lived in Ohio the previous year. 

The results reveal that most Ohioan emigrés are flocking to Florida, presumably looking for a more pleasing climate than that offered by their native state. Yet the next four top destinations — Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Indiana — are neighboring states, with not dissimilar climates, suggesting that although people want and sometimes need to move, they may still prefer to remain near their first home and family. (Note the 40 places where young people are moving.)

Click here to see where people from Ohio are moving the most

To identify where people from Ohio are moving to most, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed state-to-state migration flows from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS), revealing the number of people living in other states (or Washington D.C.) in 2019 who had lived in Ohio the previous year. State population and population change figures are based on one-year estimates from the ACS (five-year estimates for Washington D.C.)

According to the ACS, “Data are based on a sample and are subject to sampling variability. The degree of uncertainty for an estimate arising from sampling variability is represented through the use of a margin of error. The value shown here is the 90 percent margin of error. The margin of error can be interpreted roughly as providing a 90 percent probability that the interval defined by the estimate minus the margin of error and the estimate plus the margin of error (the lower and upper confidence bounds) contains the true value. In addition to sampling variability, the ACS estimates are subject to nonsampling error…. The effect of nonsampling error is not represented in these tables.”

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